2017 Film

Brief Summary

The generation gap has never been wider than it is in Pieter Van Hees’ deliriously absurd satire, pitting old generation money against Millennial apathy—and the occasional naked anarchist—following Belgium’s economic collapse.

Full Description

It was on a Wednesday—or maybe a Thursday—that everything changed. Belgium’s vaunted credit rating was slashed dramatically, downgraded all the way from a lofty AA+ to a B, and suddenly everything went to shit. The older generation still had whatever they had in tangible assets, sure, but the strain was obvious and nobody who managed to keep a job was going to leave it any time soon. And the younger generation? Well, they were left with whatever scraps they could find.

Thrown into this mess is Jonas, a pleasantly bland young man who grew up in privilege but with no useful skills whatsoever. Chronically unemploye, Jonas’ life came crashing down when his girlfriend—the provider of the pair—left him, leaving him both broke and homeless. His only option seems to be an underpaid, illegal job in a call center and renting an overly expensive couch in an overcrowded apartment with a beautiful hacker and chronically naked anarchist plotting revolution against the baby boomers. His only hope? Get his girlfriend to take him back. Or, perhaps, a fresh handout from mom and dad.

Like all the best social satire GENERATION B takes an all too real premise—rising student debts and rampant underemployment for even the best and brightest of the young generation—and pushes it out to ludicrous extremes. Pieter Van Hees—known in these parts for ultra-serious efforts LEFT BANK and WASTE LAND—takes gleeful delight in jabbing his finger into the eye of both the entitled upper classes and the aimless drift of entitled youth coming to realize there may be nothing left to be entitled to. The results are sometimes painful, often bizarre and consistently hilarious.  GENERATION B is a comedy for those members of the Occupy generation who would love nothing more than to sell out if only there was someone to sell out to. (Todd Brown)